New Stock

Christo Coetzee. Paintings from London and Paris 1954 – 1964.

“Illustrating many of the provocative and imaginative canvases produced by Christo Coetzee from his years in post war London to the formative influences of Spanish art and culture and his productive association with French, Italian and Japanese contemporary artists.” Includes a number of photographs. Price – $20.00 (ZAR-250.00)

The History of False Bay up to 1795. (Signed by the author).

Preface by Admiral H H Biermann, President of Simon’s Town Historical Society. Illustrated paste-downs in the front. A fascinating book of False Bay from its first sighting by the Portuguese navigator Bartholomew Diaz in 1488 to the time of the 1st British Occupation in 1975.

Price – $90.00 (ZAR-950.00)

Sydney Carter. (Artist)

Contributions by Eric Rosenthal and Charles F Rey. Distributed by Central News Agency, Ltd, South Africa.

Price – $32.00 (ZAR-380.00)

The Story of Peer’s Cave.

A fascinating story about a family of amateur naturalists, archaeologists and paleontologists and the important discoveries they made in various caves in the Fish Hoek valley. This book is perfect for anyone interested in the natural history of people and animals in the Cape. Price – $25.00 (ZAR-280.00)

Lyons Teas Shop Lithograph


‘The Cricket Match’
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $980.00 (ZAR-13800)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithograph


‘Flight into Egypt’
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $350.00 (ZAR-7000.00)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithographs


‘Fishing at Marlow’

During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $500.00 (ZAR-7000)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithograph


Cornish Pilchard Boat.
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $450.00 (ZAR-5800)

Bowler’s Cape Town. Life at the Cape in Early Victorian Times 1834 – 1868. (Signed by the author)

Numbered 292. Includes 94 sketches (4 in colour) of Cape scenes with descriptions of the social, economic and religious life of mid-Victorian Cape Town Price – $30.00 (ZAR-350.00)

The Colonising Camera – Photographs in the Making of Namibian History.

“The core of the book is an exhibition of colonial photographs from Namibia, dating from the onset of South African colonial rule. The exhibition is accompanied by commentaries which explore the intertwined themes of photography and colonialism.” Previous owner’s name on half-title page. Price – $115.00 (ZAR-1200.00)

Dorps. Small Towns of South Africa.

Photographing the small towns – a part of ‘Old Africa’ that is quickly disappearing.

Price – $85.00 (ZAR-950.00)

Rorke’s Drift. Empowering Prints.

Twenty years of printmaking in South Africa. The Art and Craft Centre at Rorke’s Drift was one of the very few places that offered training to black artists during the apartheid years. The author describes the beginnings of the Centre in the 1960s and the founding and development of the Fine Art School in 1968 until its closure in 1982. Includes a catalogue and brief biography of the artists associated with the project. Price – $20.00 (ZAR-250.00)

The False Bay Story. (Signed by author)

This title is the 3rd book in the trilogy on the sea approaches of the Western Cape. Packed with information and brimming with interest about the people who lived in the coastal towns. Illustrated with 110 monochrome and colour pictures showing life in False Bay in all its aspects plus 16 charts and maps drawn between 1656 and 1796 Price – $32.00 (ZAR-380.00)

Discovering Wild Flowers in Southern Africa.

An illustrated book designed to guide the traveller to the most colourful flora which are to be seen either along or near the main highways. Price – $10.00 (ZAR-100.00)

The People of Kau.

This is a photographic monograph on the life of the people of Kau. Included are images of the knife-fights, dances of love and elaborately painted faces and bodies. The Nuba people reside in one of the most remote and inaccessible places in all of Sudan – the foothills of the Nuba Mountains in central Sudan. “Leni Riefenstahl’s unforgettable photographic impressions of the life of the People of Kau bear final witness to a primitive tribe which is menaced by the advance of industrial civilisation and slowly subsiding into the mists of time. Price – $45.00 (ZAR-550.00)

Kuanyama Ambo Folklore.

Anthropological Records. Vol 13, No. 4. Includes 1 figure in text and 1 map. Price – $16.00 (ZAR-200.00)

Dumile Feni. 1942 – 1991

Catalogue of Dumile Feni’s work. 08 – 20 September 2007 at the Gallery Momo in Johanneburg. Price – $18.00 (ZAR-200.00)

“Red Revolt”. The Rand Strike January – March 1922. The Worker’ Story.

A rare booklet written for the Communist Party (S.A.) by S P Bunting with a foreward by W H Andrews. Price – $48.00 (ZAR-550.00)

The Seaside News Album. Muizenberg, Kalk Bay and Simons Town.

Circa 1903. Vintage black and white photographs showing architecture, beaches, warships and fishing boats. A particularly beautiful and interesting panorama of Muizenberg from the beach towards Main Road. Price – $100.00 (ZAR-1100.00)

Jameson’s Heroic Charge. A True Story. A Complete Vindication of the Reform Movement.

This booklet was published a month after Dr Jameson’s infamous raid into the Transvaal Republic. A rare example of early Johannesburg printing. Lists included at the rear are: a government official list of the killed and wounded in Jameson’s column; also the names of the Reform Committee; a Relief Fund list of donors and the amounts subscribed; a list of “The Charter Prisoners,” and the official list of the Boers killed and wounded.’ Adverts at the rear of the booklet.

Price – $44.00 (ZAR-500.00)

Synopsis of the Edible Fishes at the Cape of Good Hope.

‘The author’s chief guide for this ichthyological essay was through personal observation, the accounts of the local fisherman and nature herself.’ At the time of publication there had been little attention paid to this part of natural history of the fishes that inhabited our bays, namely Table Bay, False Bay and the coast of Hottentot’s Holland Mountains. Price – $135.00 (ZAR-1600.00)

The Strike that did not Fail. The Great Strike of the Federated Trades Union of the Witwatersrand.

Price – $24.00 (ZAR-300.00)

Album: Souvenir of Cape Town.

Souvenir booklet of colour lithographic photographs circa 1915, depicting scenes of the old promenade pier, architecture in Adderley and Strand streets, South African library, Railway Station, scenic coastal road and others. Price – $34.00 (ZAR-400.00)

In Darkest Africa or the Quest Rescue and Retreat of Emin, Governor of Equatoria.

With one hundred and fifty woodcut illustrations. New end-papers. Spine and front cover have been replaced. Lacks map on Page 309. Ink stamps on three pages: verso of frontispiece, title page and Author and Publishers notes. Price – $65 (ZAR-500.00)

J G Gubbins – Sketch Book.

Personal sketch book of John Gasperd Gubbins 1877 – 1935. Ottoshoop, Naauwpoort. Possibly more than one artist. Ref: Gubbins Collection – Wits University).

Price – $72.00 (ZAR-800.00)