A Monograph of the Coraciidae or Family of the Rollers.

Twenty Seven hand coloured plates by Keulemans, with facing text.




Price – $9000.00 (ZAR-90000.00)

A Photographic Postcard of a Steam Train – Mombasa.

Titled “A Narrow Squeak”. Photographer W.A. Young. The stamp has been removed. The remains of the Mombasa postmark are visible, with the date 1903.


Price – $22.00 (ZAR-280.00)

A Photographic Postcard of Penguins at Luderitz.

A used postcard with the Luderitzbucht postmark. Posted to Cape Town in 1906. Inscribed to the front Luderitzbacht 15.12.06 and G.C.S.


Price – $5.00 (ZAR-60.00)

A Photographic Postcard Showing Luderitz.

Inscribed to the front and back. With the Luderitzbach postmark and stamp of 1906.


Price – $12.00 (ZAR-140.00)

An Unused Photographic Postcard of a Rhodesian Rugby Team

A sporting team c.1900 with a cut-out elephant mascot.


Price – $8.00 (ZAR-90.00)

An Unused Postcard Displaying Stamps of German S.W.A.

With the full range of stamps from the 3 penny to the 5 mark stamp. The actual stamps have been attached to the card. The stamps showing theKeizer’s yacht were issued in 1901.


Price – $2.00 (ZAR-280.00)

An Unused Postcard. Prosit Neujahr aus D.S.W. Afrika

c.1910

Price – $8.00 (ZAR-80.00)

Catalogue of Prints in the Africana Museum and in books in the Strange Collection of Africana in the Johannesburg Public Library up to 1870

Excellent reference work in 2 volumes.




Price – $170.00 (ZAR-2200.00)

Cowboy Kate & Other Stories. Inscribed

A first edition of this classic photo book. Inscribed by haskins to his friend Jan Mostert of the Rembrandt Foundation.


Price – $600.00 (ZAR-6500.00)

Fred Page (1908 – 1984)

dsc_4610

Medium: linocut

Size: frame 48 x 69cm
image :33 x 38cm

Title: untitled, fragments of a city

Date: c. 1980

Original linocut by Fred Page. Part of the series called Fragments of a City that were produced by Joe Wolpe for Page. This unsigned print is one of a few extras that were produced and were acquired by the previous owner from Wolpe.

Fred Page (1908 – 1984)

dsc_4600

Medium: linocut

Size: frame 56 x 53cm
image :25 x 26.5cm

Title: untitled, fragments of a city

Date: c. 1980

Original linocut by Fred Page. Part of the series called Fragments of a City that were produced by Joe Wolpe for Page. This unsigned print is one of a few extras that were produced and were acquired by the previous owner from Wolpe.

Gelatin Silver print by Paul Alberts.

This photograph was published in Albert’s book ‘Some Evidence of Things Seen’, 1997. The book was published as a charitable endeavour, in order to raise awareness of the plight of children in South Africa.
 “The location was Wag-‘n-Bietjie near Pretoria. The occasion was a leadership conference of the militant ultra-rightwing leader, Eugene Terreblanche’s Afrikaner – Weerstand – Beweging (AWB). The time was 1986 when Terreblanche’s popularity was growing. I watched this little boy disappearing behind the trees and shrubs to urinate and when he came back I started photographing him. He was an attractive boy with a lovely smile, but he stopped and looked at me with some trepidation. He also looked beyond me, with great uncertainty on his face. Suddenly a man’s voice spoke to him from behind my back: “Groet die Oom my seun” (Greet the uncle my son). It was his father speaking. The little boy then stood on guard, swiftly raised his right arm in the AWB salute and grinned.” Ref: Some Evidence of Things Seen by Paul Alberts.

Price – $200.00 (ZAR-2200.00)

Hans Anton Aschenborn – Folio III

Limited edition folio of 10 offset prints by Hans Anton Aschenborn partly taken from the large “Afrika-Mappe” with accompanying booklet. No.43






Price – $64 (ZAR-600)

i-Jusi: Issue 2

Magazine of South African art and design, this issue focused on Durban.

Price – $20.00 (ZAR-200.00)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithograph


Cornish Pilchard Boat.
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $450.00 (ZAR-5800)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithograph


‘Flight into Egypt’
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $350.00 (ZAR-7000.00)

Lyons Tea Shop Lithographs


‘Fishing at Marlow’

During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $500.00 (ZAR-7000)

Lyons Teas Shop Lithograph


‘The Cricket Match’
During the Second World War much of London, and Britain’s other major cities, were scarred with bomb damage. The Lyons teashops had not received any maintenance, other than urgent structural attention, during the five years the war lasted. They were showing signs of shabbiness but little could be done while materials were in short supply. In 1947, Felix and Julian Salmon (Directors), thought that the interiors could be brightened by some pictures and they approached Jack Beddington (1893-1959), Artistic Director of Shell-Mex, for advice. Lyons were aware of the successful 1930s advertising campaign which Shell Mex had undertaken and this seemed like a good starting point. They also wanted to encourage young post war artists, some of whom had worked for Beddington.

Beddington commissioned paintings, bought some, and chose artists, no doubt with the co-operation of Barnett Freedman (1901-1958). Freedman was a leading authority on auto-lithography, in which the artist draws the plates from which the work is printed. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and was largely self-taught although was bedridden for years as a boy. He started work at 15 as an Architectural Draughtsman and attended the Royal College of Art between 1922-5 and subsequently taught there and at Ruskin College, Oxford. His lithograph commissions included Shell-Mex & BP Ltd, London Passenger Transport Board, British Broadcasting Corporation, General Post Office, the Ministry of Information and he designed the King George V Jubilee Stamp. He was made a CBE in 1946. During the Second World War Freedman was an official war artist after which he became a successful commercial designer and book illustrator. Freedman’s work with Lyons was mainly involved in the twenty or so subjects being produced by auto-lithography. No doubt he would have seen the proofs of others and possibly would have advised on them.

The first series of sixteen posters included some which had been drawn to plate by the artists and others which were printed using the skills of craftsmen lithographers at Chromoworks Ltd, London. The militant printing trade unions were unhappy at the idea of non-union artists creating printing plates, but the compromise of half the posters being the artists’ responsibility and half being handled by union lithographers was sensible because not all the artists were competent at auto-lithography. The artists usually received a fee of between £50-£150, presumably depending on their reputation and competence of their work and whether an original was used or auto-lithographed. Artists also benefited, unusually, from royalties on copies sold. The print run for the initial sixteen commissions, and for that matter the subsequent series, was 1,500 copies of each plate. While most of the posters were in quad crown (29 x 39 inches) some were smaller. Although the plates were kept for a time there is no record to show that reprints were undertaken. It must be assumed therefore that all pictures in circulation are ‘first’ editions.

The finished lithographs were introduced to the press at the Trocadero Restaurant by Sir Stafford Cripps, then President of the Board of Trade, on 21 October 1947. By special request a copy of the original paintings, and their lithographs, were retained and viewed by Queen Mary at a tea party organized by the directors the following day. Prints were stuck onto blocks of wood (some were merely stuck to mirrors) and hung in only 30 London teashops initially but they generated so much interest that shortly afterwards they were displayed in all the Lyons’ teashops. Subsequently, lithographs were made available for purchase to the public at 12/6d for the smaller size and 17/6d for the large size. These were 1955 prices and there is some evidence that earlier issues were less expensive. Employees for example, with discount, were offered the earlier series at 10/- to 11/6d per copy depending on size.

A second and third issue of lithographs were commissioned in 1951 and 1955 respectively. While the first issue included sixteen images, the second and third issues numbered twelve each. The completion of the whole project was marked by an exhibition of the forty posters at the Tea Centre, London, which was opened by Sir Kenneth Clark, Slade Professor of Fine Art, Oxford. Copies of the lithographs were bought by a number of museums and art galleries and when mounted in glass frames were popular in our Embassies and High Commissions. There was a retrospective exhibition in the South London Art Gallery in June 1977.

When the teashops closed in the 1960/70s those lithographs which had been framed were dispersed. Some were hung in managers’ offices at Cadby Hall and elsewhere, others were probably kept by staff and some may even have been thrown out. Those which had been stuck to mirrors were difficult to remove and had to be scraped off. In some cases, when teashops were refurbished, they were just hidden behind new panelling with the earlier bevelled mirrors and expensive marble-work. A fine exhibition of thirty posters was staged in 2004 by the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. A near complete set of the posters (missing The Shire Hall, Lynton Lamb, second series No 7) was donated to the London Metropolitan Archives by J. Lyons & Co Ltd in the 1980s. The Shire Hall gap was remedied with an artist’s proof supplied by Andrew Lamb, the artist’s son.

Price – $980.00 (ZAR-13800)

My Caricatures

Printed on gloss paper and illustrated in b/w. With a foreword by John Merriman.



Price – $78.00 (ZAR-850.00)

November Girl. Inscribed by Haskins

The third photographic essay by Sam Haskins. Inscribed on the free end paper “For Jannie from Sam.” Jan Mostert worked for the Rembrandt Foundation.


Price – $500.00 (ZAR-5300)

Rails of the World: Portfolio Edition

Introductory chapters and abbreviated species account; a monograph of the family Rallidae, with 41 loose prints of colour paintings.



Price – $29.00 (ZAR-300.00)

Scenic South Africa – A Collection of Real Photographs – Round about Cape Town

Eight photographs of Cape Town tipped onto black album pages with printed captions. Photographs of: the docks, old Malay cemetery, Sea Point, Groote Schuur, Rondebosch, Rosebank, Newlands and Kalk Bay. String bound with printed card wraps.

The front wrap notes that this is the second series produced. Condition is good. Tears to the edges of the card wraps. Some light oxidation to the edges of the photos.

Price – $50.00 (ZAR-600.00)

Souvenir of Scotland. Its Cities, Lakes and Mountains. One Hundred and Twenty Chromo Views

One hundred and twenty bright chromolithographic views printed two per page. Bound in mauchline wear boards. Gilt edges all round.


Price – $340.00 (ZAR-3800.00)

Souvenir of Scotland. Its Cities, Lakes and Mountains. One Hundred and Twenty Chromo Views

One hundred and twenty bright chromolithographic views printed two per page. Bound in mauchline wear boards. Gilt edges all round.


Price – $340.00 (ZAR-3800.00)

Spektrum June 1971

German publication containing original poetry and 7 woodcuts. Includes original signed woodcut of title page as additional insert. Special numbered edition (109).


Price – $85,00 (ZAR-850,00)

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